Alloa Elim Church is located in the centre of Alloa adjacent to a large free public car park. The congregation is one of 25 established in Scotland, and is part of the Elim Movement in the UK. Our folks are very welcoming and provide a family atmosphere for all ages. There is a Kid’s Church and Youth Fellowship.

Meetings are normally held on a Sunday at 11am, with further activities and functions taking place on most days. However, following a period during which the building was closed because of the Covid-19 pandemic, Sunday morning services have resumed with social distancing and other restrictions in place. The congregation also meet on-line, using digital technology, on Sundays at 6pm. Bible Studies and Prayer Meetings also take place on-line – please contact us for more information.

The building is also hired out for various functions, with slimming clubs and private functions such as birthday parties being strong favourites. There are also strong links with the Alloa community, such as the football club and local schools, and the Community House project.

An Elim Church was established in Alloa in the 1950’s and the congregation moved to the current building in 1991.

About the Building

Greenside Mission Chapel, designed by local architect John Melvin, is a well detailed Gothic chapel, which makes a significant contribution to the local streetscape. It is sited on a key thoroughfare in Alloa and the exterior of the building is largely unaltered with high quality architectural features such as the square tower and stonework.

Constructed to provide meeting accommodation for the Alloa Young Men’s Christian Association the building was funded by their honorary president, David Paton of Tillicoultry. It originally consisted of a large hall with gallery that could accommodate over 500 people, and two class-rooms in the two right bays. The Annual Register for the Country of Clackmannanshire describes the interior of the hall as ‘artistically finished, the pannellings and moulding round the wood-work being all richly carved, while it is lighted up with a rich gasalier, and has a brilliant appearance’, however this no longer remains. Formally opened in July 1873 the building took two years to construct and was originally under the supervision of Moncrieff United Park Church. Services continued until 1949.

John Melvin senior was a prolific architect of churches, principally for the United Presbyterian Church where he was a member. He established an architectural practice in his native town of Alloa in 1826, and designed many buildings in the area. He commenced his career as a joiner in the family business and frequently combined this with his architecture, executing the joinery work at his buildings. His principal clients were the Paton family. His son, John Melvin Junior became a partner in his father’s practice in circa 1874.

The Paton family founded their wealth in the spinning and drying of wool. Commencing as John Paton’s cottage industry the company was to become the largest wool spinning company in Great Britain, with its principal mill, Kilncraigs, in Alloa near the site of this chapel. After amalgamation in 1920, the company was known as Patons and Baldwins. The family became generous benefactors to the town. John Thomson Paton funded the town hall and public library which opened in 1888, and Alexander Paton funded Old Paton’s Mill School which was adjacent to the church. The Paton family supported The Temperance Movement and encouraged locals to join churches.